Forum Posts

Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Mar 27, 2020
In Open Forum
During the widespread Coronavirus quarantine, Dr. Jay Wile has created an interesting new function on his blog. This function is a button that, when clicked, will generate a random article which will hopefully proceed to generate discussion and debate (or, at least, some interesting reading material). I have posted a link to this button here for the gratification of all: https://blog.drwile.com/show-me-a-random-post/. If you want to discuss or debate the article you get, feel free to post a link--and your thoughts on the article--below. For, as Dr. Wile writes above the button: "Use the post as a topic for your conversation. If it fails to generate sufficient interaction split into two groups to argue for or against the topic in the post" Happy reading! @windar12q @ekrause1406 @ekrause1406 @S.M.S. @cwh @Kirk Peters @agetoage07 @burrawang @burrawang @T_aquaticus.
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Mar 02, 2020
In Open Forum
A recent study has some exciting results. In fact, it strongly indicates the discovery of dinosaur DNA! I would be curious to hear some thoughts on this: @burrawang @burrawang @windar12q @S.M.S. @cwh @T_aquaticus @Kirk Peters @ekrause1406 @knelst @patricktnj @jammycakes. Here is a link to the original study: https://academic.oup.com/nsr/advance-article/doi/10.1093/nsr/nwz206/5762999 Here is a link to one of Jay Wile's blog posts discussing it: https://blog.drwile.com/no-other-explanation-dinosaur-dna/#more-24138
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Feb 29, 2020
In Open Forum
Greetings, all! Biologos is currently running a random drawing for signed copies of The Language of God by Francis Collins. Here is my share link to the competition, should any of you be interested: https://wn.nr/GpTE5b. Cheers!
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Aug 28, 2019
In Open Forum
Greetings, all! Recently, a new update was released for our forum here which allows me to create "badges" and award them to specific commentators. You may have already noticed some of them on your user profile! Anyway, feel free to suggest ideas for new badges (or changes to current ones) on this thread! Thanks!
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Aug 05, 2019
In Discussion Questions
One important discussion which is closely related to the ce-debate is the ongoing debate between atheism and theism (or, often, Christianity). Please feel free to share your favorite arguments for atheism and/or theism (and why you favor them)!
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Feb 13, 2019
In Discussion Questions
What do you mean by "Evolution?" Is evolution simply the idea that the traits of a species can change (to an extent, give or take) over time, or is it the theory which fully explains the diversification of life on earth from single-celled organisms? Or, is it something else? What are your favorite pieces of evidence for backing up your understanding of evolution? Alternatively, what are your favorite examples of evidence against evolution?
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Jan 01, 2019
In Discussion Questions
What are your thoughts on the origin of life? Is life the end result of natural processes, the result of divine action, or something else?
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Nov 20, 2018
In Discussion Questions
What natural phenomenon do you believe best supports or denies an old Earth and/or universe? Why?
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Nov 08, 2018
In Open Forum
https://biologos.org/blogs/brad-kramer-the-evolving-evangelical/a-letter-to-my-son-about-creation This isn't even reinterpreting scripture. This is rewriting scripture. I hope this was not the intention of BioLogos, but the article seems to (instead of "harmonize" scripture and "science") synthesize "science" and scripture into a nearly unrecognizable chimera as well as giving the impression that scripture should be derived from science. I don't know if this was their intention at all (and I really hope it wasn't), but please feel free to read the article (link above) and decide for yourself.
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Oct 26, 2018
In Discussion Questions
Would evolution need God in order to work, or would evolution rule out God entirely? What do you think? Why?
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Sep 20, 2018
In Discussion Questions
If evidence is open to interpretation based on differing worldviews, is that evidence really valid? Is the only way to make ambiguous evidence count for a specific worldview to prove the interpretation of the other worldview false?
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Aug 20, 2018
In Discussion Questions
Does the evolutionary progression and timescale irreconcilably contradict the Bible? What do you think?
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Jun 18, 2018
In Article Discussion
Note: This page is a forum topic, not an article written by (or necessarily reflecting the views of) Creation v. Evolution Debate. Thank you for understanding. https://evolutionnews.org/2018/06/humans-and-animals-are-mostly-the-same-age/ A recent study seems to indicate that humans and around 90% of other animal species all arose at the same time around 100,00 to 200,000 years ago. Following are a couple of excerpts from an article on Evolution News pertaining to this idea: An exciting new paper in the journal Human Evolution has been published which you can read here. Popular science reports such as this have incautiously claimed, “They found out that 9 out of 10 animal species on the planet came to being at the same time as humans did some 100,000 to 200,000 years ago.” This could indicate intelligent design, an event where species came into existence for the first time. But it could also indicate something else, such as a population crash (or crashes) that affected almost all life on Earth. Either way, if the paper is right, it would be a shock to established scientific expectations. “This conclusion is very surprising,” co-author David Thaler of the University of Basel is quoted as saying, “and I fought against it as hard as I could.” His co-author is fellow geneticist Mark Stoeckle of Rockefeller University in New York. https://evolutionnews.org/2018/06/humans-and-animals-are-mostly-the-same-age/ Click here to read the original paper.
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Jun 18, 2018
In Discussion Questions
Why is it important to discover the truth about origins? If Creation is correct, what are the implications? If evolution is correct, what are the implications? Does the origins debate matter at all?
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
May 19, 2018
In Article Discussion
https://creation.com/roraima-pollen Here are a couple excerpts from the article (by Emil Silvestru): "The evolutionary paradox of the Roraima pollen of South America is still not solved." Microfossils have been reported from the Roraima Formation (RF) in British Guiana as early as 1964, soon after its Paleoproterozoic age was ‘established’. They were described as sponge spicules and possible remnants of foraminifera and radiolaria. The previous year well-preserved pollen and spores were found in rocks from Cero Venamo (composed of the same RF rocks) by botanist Dunsterville. His discovery was treated with suspicion, given the Precambrian age for the formation. Then in 1966, Stainforth6 announced the discovery of pollen and spores (henceforth called ‘microfossils’) in the same formation at Paruima. The microfossil assemblage is described as different from the present local floral association and is most likely ‘Tertiary’ (Stainforth mentions some authors who place it in the Miocene). Although no palynological inventory is presented, angiosperm pollen must be included. And the second quote: With all the above in mind, since according to observational science contamination is the least probable of all possibilities (a Holmesian ‘impossible’), there seem to be only two solutions: 1. The whole evolutionary biostratigraphy which places the first angiosperm pollen in the Early Cretaceous is wrong, angiosperms being in fact present throughout the entire geologic column (does that sound like something you have already read about?). This would of course be the equivalent of Haldane’s rabbit and mortally wound the ‘evolutionary elephant’. 2. The CF is Tertiary in age and not Paleoproterozoic, completely rejecting radiometric dating. If so, the very concept of radiometric dating and particularly its reliability needs to be questioned. Either possibility is simply unacceptable to the evolutionary establishment, hence the escape into the improbable: contamination. A concept that has already served to settle similar problems before: when radiometric dating is clearly at odds with the established biostratigraphy, contamination (‘radioisotope contamination’) is invoked. Or, when accepting contamination would challenge the very concept of radiometric dating, ‘out of place fossils’ (‘fossil contamination’) are invoked.
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
May 19, 2018
In Discussion Questions
Many YEC organizations say that if evolution is true, the truth of almost the entire Bible is undermined (not to mention it's authority). Would you agree or disagree with this statement? Why?
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
May 07, 2018
In Open Forum
Greetings, all! Our friend Dr. Joshua Swamidass recently officially launched a discussion forum for his website. I would strongly encourage people to take a look at this new forum, as it's mission of encouraging gracious dialogue between the sides of the origins debate is similar to the mission of this website: https://discourse.peacefulscience.org
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Apr 20, 2018
In Article Discussion
https://creation.com/do-rivers-erode-through-mountains We shall continue our discussions of whether or not YEC claims stand up to scrutiny with an examination of water gaps, which allegedly provide further evidence that the Earth's geological landscape has been shaped by extreme flooding in the relatively recent past. Many rivers, after travelling along a valley, suddenly turn and flow through a narrow gorge that cuts through a mountain range, a ridge, or a plateau. Such gorges are called water gaps. It looks like the river cut the gorge, but how could it? Surely, if the river had carved the landscape slowly over long ages, it would have flowed around the barrier instead of flowing through it. So was the gorge eroded first by something we don’t see happening today? There are many hypotheses for the origin of water gaps based on slow processes of erosion over millions of years. However, these ideas are rarely based on evidence. Thomas Oberlander has many sobering thoughts about research on water gaps: … the question of the origin of geological discordant drainage [water gaps] has almost always been attacked deductively, leading toward conclusions that remain largely within the realm of conjecture’ (Emphasis added).
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Apr 19, 2018
In Discussion Questions
The category of "historical science" deals with the study of data gained from events which primarily happened in the past, and for which there is not typically any experimental data. YEC's often attempt to discredit the reliability of historical science for this reason. What is your perspective?
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Jonathan Schulz
Commentator
Commentator
Mar 20, 2018
In Article Discussion
https://answersingenesis.org/astronomy/cosmology/galaxies-unexplained-spirals/ After a short intermission, we are back on our series on whether YEC claims stand up to scrutiny. This Answers in Genesis article asserts that spiral galaxies prove that the universe cannot be as old as is commonly believed. Some excerpts: In the 1930s astronomers realized a problem, though. The outer stars needed more time to complete their orbit than the inner stars. As the distance from the center of a galaxy increases, the spiral arms ought to become unstable. That is, after a few rotations, spiral arms ought to smear out. Astronomers debated for years whether spiral arms wound up or unwound, depending upon the direction of rotation. No matter which view they adopted, however, if galaxies are at least ten billion years old, as is generally thought, then no spiral arms should be left.
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